Dating violence statistics college students

A victim of domestic violence may feel that coming forward would threaten her or his social reputation, or would “ruin the life” of a prominent campus figure (though, of course, it was that prominent figure who broke the law).Social media now plays an increased role, as teenagers and college students have the opportunity to covertly bully and threaten victims online.Victims are sometimes forced to continue attending class alongside their abusers or even live in the same residence hall.These missteps may stem in part from the mistaken perception that most college students prefer to “hook up” rather than engage in committed relationships, and that instances of dating violence are nothing more than isolated disputes between students. Most students do not frequently “hook up,” and instances of violence between intimate partners in college are a form of domestic violence.

It is thought that nearly one in four college women have either been raped or suffered an attempted rape – and most knew their abusers beforehand.

The abuser terrorizes his or her victim using physical force, coercion or threats, and takes advantage of a person he or she claims to care for.

Domestic violence can, but doesn’t always, occur in acts of sexual abuse.

Many students are also away from home for the first time and may feel isolated from their trusted support networks, especially family.

Beyond the social pressures, there are administrative challenges to face.

This same law has received plenty of publicity as it concerns equal athletics funding, but its purview over dating violence has perhaps been underplayed.

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